I have an abundance of notes from the Applied Improvisation Conference a few weeks ago in Austin. Suffice it to say it was all-around great. I have to compile these notes for a meeting next week, but they’ll be too detailed and improv nerdy for most people reading this post. What would be more useful, I think, […]

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The Fourth Principle of GameChangers is that Game Explores Theme. The way we we ensure outcomes that matter when we design an ERGO (game) is through the conscious exploration of a Theme. A theme is a guiding idea. A good theme is both expansive and specific. It is the glue that holds together a narrative, as […]

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The Third GameChangers Principle is that there are infinite games. Simply put, there is no situation, scenario, or engagement for which a productive game cannot be designed. A good illustration of this came to me in my Facebook feed this morning, via Henk van der Steen, a brilliant improviser friend from Amsterdam. He posted this […]

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The current issue of The Economist features a short piece in its Business & Finance section entitled, “The Pivotal Moment:  Bet on a boss who can twirl on his toes.” In it, venture capitalist Alan Patricof of Greycroft Partners is quoted indirectly as saying he is looking to invest in “young firms whose bosses know […]

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With each passing week, we hear more about the application of improvisation to business.  American companies, from core to edge, from the C-suite to the street, are becoming more conscious of the need to be agile in a networked business environment, and that means learning how to improvise better.   These companies (excluding the already-agile […]

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Last in a series… While at the Applied Improvisation Conference, I drank beer one afternoon with Gary Schwartz, of Spolin.com. Gary is Viola (pronounced vy-OH-la) Spolin’s protege, keeper and practitioner of what is, in my opinion, the mother lode of improvisation, the practice built by the grand dame of the craft, the godmother of the […]

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Last weekend, I attended the Applied Improvisation Network’s yearly conference, which was held outside Portland, at stately Edgefield Manor. Edgefield Manor, for the first 50 years of its existence, used to be what was called a Poor Farm, where indigent people could work on the land and get a hand finding a pathway back into […]

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