Weird. Based on something said in a conversation I had this morning with Alistair Cockburn, author of the landmark book, Agile Software Development: The Cooperative Game, I was going to write a post about the old cliche, glass half-empty or half-full? And then later today this quote by Mark Cuban appeared in my LinkedIn feed: […]

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Yesterday, I gave a talk at the Social Media Breakfast in Los Angeles. The subject was how our Big Story model can be a useful complement to Big Data. Afterward, in a lively Q&A, Bob Dickman of Narrative Influence posed a question that I struggled to answer at the time, and that I’ve been thinking […]

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There are four types of time to consider when building your business narrative: CHRONOLOGICAL time. The name for this type of time comes from a Greek word for time, “chronos.” The Greeks named a god, Chronos, for this type of time. You know about this time. It’s the dominant time frame of the industrialized world. It […]

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Our ERGO communication training system is based on improvisational game structure. Because ERGO is participatory, generative and adaptive, it can produce business outcomes at a scale, and at a level of complexity required in a networked communication environment.  There’s an old street saying, “Game recognizes game.” That’s one way of putting it, but it’s it’s […]

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The Fourth Principle of GameChangers is that Game Explores Theme. The way we we ensure outcomes that matter when we design an ERGO (game) is through the conscious exploration of a Theme. A theme is a guiding idea. A good theme is both expansive and specific. It is the glue that holds together a narrative, as […]

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The Third GameChangers Principle is that there are infinite games. Simply put, there is no situation, scenario, or engagement for which a productive game cannot be designed. A good illustration of this came to me in my Facebook feed this morning, via Henk van der Steen, a brilliant improviser friend from Amsterdam. He posted this […]

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Dowsing is the ancient practice of seeking what is hidden (most often associated with dowsing or “divining” water underground with a divining rod). My grandmother was a dowser. She used the forked limb from a peach tree to find underground water for friends and relatives drilling water wells in Indiana. I wrote a post about […]

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Excerpts from The Skate Whisperer a profile in Deadspin written by Lucy Madison of Olympic figure skating coach, Frank Carroll: “There’s a difference between being a coach and being a teacher,” Carroll told me in December. “Teaching involves being able to on-pass knowledge about how to do a skill; how to teach someone to use […]

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  This NY Times Jan 9 post by Bill Pennington evaluating the performance of World Cup champion U.S. skier, Mikaela Shiffrin, can apply to any kind of performance, in any field. Money quotes from the post: “Any predetermined strategy was remarkably elemental and always focused on process, not results … a light race schedule … […]

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I can’t not comment on yesterday’s well-publicized meltdown at CES by film director Michael Bay. I’m not going to add to the snarky commentary, which the internets provide in abundance. I’m going to empathize. We’ve all had moments when our mind blanks. The script that was in our head (or in Bay’s case on the […]

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